The Free Trade Agreement between the United States and Morocco entered into force on January 1, 2006. When the agreement entered into force, 95% of consumer and industrial goods manufactured in the United States were immediately exempt from customs duties. Tariffs on most of the remaining qualified products will be gradually reduced over a period of up to nine years. For a limited number of products, customs duties will expire for a maximum period of 15 years. The rules for determining the country of origin can be very simple when a product is entirely grown or manufactured and assembled in a country. However, if a finished product contains components from many countries, determining origin can be more complex. Rules of origin can be very detailed and specific and vary from agreement to agreement and product to product. The highly organized opposition to NAFTA has focused on the fear that the removal of trade barriers will encourage U.S. companies to pack their bags and move to Mexico to use cheap labor. This concern grew in the early 2000s, when the economy experienced a recession and the subsequent recovery turned out to be a “recovery from unemployment.” Opposition to NAFTA was also strong among environmental groups who claimed that the anti-pollution elements of the treaty were particularly inadequate. These criticisms have not wavered since the implementation of NAFTA. Indeed, Mexico and Canada have been cited several times for environmental offences.

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